Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

The College Libraries are now open to the HCCC community -

https://library.hccc.edu/reopening

Urban Justice

Environment

Holloway, Cas, and Carter Strickland. "The Solution, Not The Problem." Environmental Forum 29.5 (2012): 30-33.
https://ezproxy.hccc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=8gh&AN=79935588&site=ehost-live

The article focuses on the consideration of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of cities for its water infrastructure protection programs. It states that the programs and focus of EPA on urban waters and environmental justice were introduced through the idea that local community empowerment could be the solution to urban environment challenges. It also mentions the collaboration of EPA with its Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA) in implementing its water programs.

 

Mock, Brentin. "Fighting For Green Justice." American Prospect 20.3 (2009): A20-A22.
https://ezproxy.hccc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=fth&AN=21332877&site=ehost-live

The article discusses the campaign of environmental-justice advocates to bring green economy to urban communities. Leaders of environmental-justice contend that green jobs should not be isolated to manufacturing of solar- and wind-energy technology, but also for the cleaning up of brownfield sites, developing urban gardens and reducing lead and asbestos levels in the inner city. The entry also describes several environmental-justice program such as the Bronx Environmental Stewardship Training (BEST) in New York and Chicago's GreenCorps program.

 

Hattam, Jennifer. "Green Streets." Sierra 91.4 (2006): 36-41.
https://ezproxy.hccc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=fth&AN=21332877&site=ehost-live

The article focuses on the cities of the United States and their environmental aspects. The mayors of Austin, Chicago and Los Angeles have each thrown down the gauntlet, declaring their city will be the most environmentally friendly. But success takes more than a showcase building or ambitious plans. A truly green city integrates environmental sustainability into everything from its sidewalks to its skyscrapers. It invests in renewables and energy efficiency, protects open space, reduces waste, and provides-clean air and water and access to healthy food for residents of all economic classes. In addition to their individual achievements, most of the cities have signed the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement, vowing to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Some of the cities with biggest transit turnaround are Salt Lake City, Minneapolis and Austin. Denver is honored for its clean energy. City known for healthy food is Madison and hall of fame cities are Chicago, New York City, Portland, San Francisco and Seattle.